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The Do’s and Don’ts of an interview with Recruiters
As a candidate centric company we help our candidates to avoid these interview mistakes. We’ve spoken to some of our top consultants and they shared some their candidate experience in an interview and how you can avoid them
Interview
4/24/2019 2:00 PMDevelop your careerBridget Maoko4/24/2019 2:00 PM
interview, candidate, advice

do's and dont's.jpgRead time - 02:36

If you live in South Africa, you should probably know that being invited for a job interview is almost a privilege. Unfortunately, some candidates do not see it that way and have a knack for blowing their own interview opportunities. We have all heard cringe-worthy stories about candidates sleeping during interviews or not even showing up at all.

As a company we help our candidates to avoid these interview mistakes. We've spoken to some of our top consultants and they shared some their candidate experience in an interview and how you can avoid them.


1.  Do not show up drunk.

This may sound cliché but it seems some candidates do not get the message and actually show up drunk in an interview or reeking of alcohol. No recruiter will want to sell you to a client in this state and will deem you a waste of time and resources as you are bringing them and their brand into disrepute.

2.  Not knowing your CV or lying about contents in it.

This is always a bad idea. Interviewers always expect you to know your CV chronology by heart. When a company discovers that you are lying, you will be disqualified and future opportunities may be denied. CV fraud is high and you do not want to come across as a CV fraudster. At the end of the day, it is your CV, it comprises of your life and work experiences there is no reason as to why you should not know it by heart.

At Communicate, we conduct thorough interviews, screenings, reference checks, verifying skills and experience. We are contracted to MIE, a background-screening agency to verify qualifications, criminal, credit, fraud and ID records. So if you are laying – it is likely we will know, and what are the chances we will call you for future opportunities?

3. Not being prepared for the interview.

Almost all our consultants stressed this point. Come prepared! You are being sold to a client, look the part! Look like you want the job!

4. Using an agency to get a counter offer.

If a recruiter discovers that you are using them just to get an offer at your current company, they might not represent you as you are a wasting their time and resourcing. Recruiters are less likely to represent people who job-hop and are prone to taking counter offers. Recruitment agencies are not there to help you get counter offers from your employer. During an interview, do not come across as someone who is likely to take one.

5.  Arrogance.

There is nothing wrong with having a higher sense of self and the same can be said about confidence. The problem comes when it borders into arrogance which infuriates the interviewer. No matter how educated or senior you are, you still have to respect your interviewer. They are your potential gateway to landing the next job.

6. Language barriers.

In South Africa like in most countries, English is an offial language and medium of instruction. When invited for an interview unless otherwise stated, you are expected to be articulate and or fluent in English. So brush up on your English and industry jargon before going in an interview. How else will an interviewer sell you to a client if they do not understand the language you speak?

This may read like another one of those tired articles giving advice to candidates about what not to do during an interview but we would not stress the message enough if candidates actually understood the importance of brushing up on language.

We have over 3 decades of experience in Connecting Great People with Great companies. Part of our process is to prepare our candidates before sending them out for interviews with our clients. Visit our website to find out how we can help you.

Literacy in Africa
Education is a crucial part of personal, national and global growth. In Africa, like in most continents the only way we can continue to develop and grow is through education.
Africa
4/10/2019 3:00 PMKnow the industryBridget Maoko4/10/2019 3:00 PM
Africa, literacy, education, growth

LINA.jpgRead time - 02:16

Education is a crucial part of personal, national and global growth. In Africa, like in most continents the only way we can continue to develop and grow is through education. But many families in Africa live below the poverty line and have limited access to quality education.

In South Africa, the government spends more money on education than the US and UK but the education system is rated 126th out of 138 countries according to World Economic Forum. There return on investment for the government on our education is low. According to the report released by the commission of inquiry into the provision of free higher education, South Africa has a significant NEET problem. NEET is an acronym used to describe a certain subset of youths in South Africa. Not in Employment, Education or Training.

Is you think this is bleak, South Africa ranks 3rd in Africa for having the best education system. That says a lot as most organisations can argue that the educational system is in dire straits. Be that as it may, it was still the country with the most educated people in Africa in 2018.

Here are the top 5 best education systems in Africa:

  1. Zimbabwe:
    The country supposedly has 90.7% literacy rate – the highest in Africa. The country is dominated by people who can read and write. English is the official and primary language.
  2. Equatorial Guinea:
    Its literacy rate is 87.0%. Every child is entitled to free primary education and this is one of the reasons why the county's literary is high.
  3. South Africa:
    The literacy rate is sitting on 86.40%.
  4. Kenya:
    In Kenya, 8 years is the specified period for primary education. Education is not mandatory in Kenya. Their literary rate is sitting on 85.10%
  5. Namibia:
    This country boasts a 85.00% literacy. It is mandatory for everyone in Namibia between the ages of 6 and 16 to receive education.

The best universities in Africa are:

  1. University of Cape Town
  2. University of the Witwatersrand
  3. Stellenbosch University
  4. University of Kwazulu-Natal and
  5. Makerere University in Uganda

The most educated Presidents in Africa are:

1.      Tanzania  - John Pombe Magufuli
Has a Bachelor of Science in education (Chemistry and History) from the University of Dar es Salaam. Has a masters and PhD from the same university.

2.      Malawi  - Dr Peter Mutharika
Studied law at the University of London before getting an LL.M degree from Yale University the next year. He then obtained the Doctor of the Science of Law
(JSD ) degree from Yale University.

 3.      Mauritius  - Ameenah Gurib

Has a BSc in Chemistry from the University of Surrey in. She holds a PhD degree in organic chemistry from Exeter University.

4.      Ivory Coast  - Alassane Ouattara  

BSc degree from present-day Drexel University (the Drexel Institute of Technology) He earned his master's degree and PhD in economics from the same university.

5.      Mali  - Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta

The president of Mali has a Master's degree in History and Master's degree in Political Science.

 South Africa, Ethiopia, Egypt, Kenya and Nigeria remain the most influential African countries to date. We connect great people in the IT, Finance, Engineering, Freight and Contracting industries throughout Africa and South Africa on a permanent or part-time basis. Visit our website to find out how we can Connect you. 

Forbes list - African billionaires 2019
Every year, Forbes tracks the wealth of African billionaires who reside in Africa or have their primary business in Africa. They calculate their net worth using assets, paper stock and currency exchanges among other aspects. Of the 20 selected this year, five of them were from South Africa and only two are female
Forbes
4/2/2019 12:00 AMKnow the industryBridget Maoko4/2/2019 12:00 AM
Forbes, Africa, rich list, Africa’s billionaires in 2019

shutterstock_1214639215.jpgRead time - 02:11

Here is it again, the famous list from Forbes, showcasing Africa's billionaires in 2019. You are probably not on the list, but here is some inspiration.

Every year, Forbes tracks the wealth of African billionaires who reside in Africa or have their primary business in Africa. They calculate their net worth using assets, paper stock and currency exchanges among other aspects. Of the 20 selected this year, five of them were from South Africa and only two are female: Isabel dos Santos, daughter of Angola's former president, Jose Eduardo dos Santos and Folorunsho Alakija of Nigeria.

In a per country ranking, Egypt and South Africa were tied with five billionaires each, followed by Nigeria with four and Morocco with two. For the eighth year in a row, Aliko Dangote of Nigeria is Africa's richest person. The second richest person is Mike Adenuga, also of Nigeria worth $9.2 billion. Number three is diamond heir Nicky Oppenheimer of South Africa, his grandfather founded diamond mining firm DeBeers, which he ran and then sold to mining giant Anglo American for $5.1 billion cash in 2012.

Three South Africans fell off the list last year, they are: Stephen Saad, founder of generics drug firm Aspen Pharmacare; Desmond Sacco, chairman of iron ore mining company Assore Group; and Chris Wiese, founder of retailer Pepkor and former chairman of the now embattled furniture retailer, Steinhoff International.

Overall, the number of African billionaires has shrunk to 20, down from 23 a year ago.

The Richest Africans as of February 2019 are:
  1. Aliko Dangote
  2. Mike Adenuga
  3. Nicky Oppenheimer
  4. Nassef Sawiris
  5. Johann Rupert
  6. Issad Rebrab
  7. Naguib Sawiris
  8. Patrice Motsepe
  9. Isabel dos Santos
  10. Mohamed Mansour
  11. Strive Masiyiwa
  12. Koos Bekker
  13. Aziz Akhannouch
  14. Mohammed Dewji
  15. Othman Benjelloun
  16. Abdulsamad Rabiu
  17. Yasseen Mansour
  18. Youssef Mansour
  19. Folorunsho Alakija
  20. Michiel Le Roux


    The five South African billionaires are:

    1. Nicky Oppenheimer
    Age: 73
    Net worth: R102 billion
    Source of wealth: Sold his family's 40% stake in De Beers, the world's biggest diamond producer to mining company Anglo American in 2012 for $5.2 billion

    2. Johann Rupert
    Age: 68
    Net worth: R74.2 billion
    Source of wealth: Rupert controls the world's largest luxury watchmaker, Cie. Financiere Richemont, through a family trust. 

    3. Patrice Motsepe
    Age: 57
    Net worth:  R35 billion
    Source of wealth: Mining business and his investment portfolio: He's the founder and chairman of African Rainbow Minerals and became a billionaire in 2008

    4. Koos Bekker
    Age: 66
    Net worth:  R33.6 billion
    Source of wealth: Bekker is revered for transforming South African newspaper publisher Naspers into an e-commerce investor & cable TV powerhouse.

    5. Michiel le Roux
    Age: 69
    Net worth:  R15.4 billion
    Source of wealth: Completing our list of SA billionaires on the Top 20 Richest Africans list is Le Roux. He founded Capitec Bank in 2001 and owns about an 11% stake.

    While we cannot help you get on the Forbes list of billionaires in Africa, we can certainly give you the edge by helping you with your next career opportunity. Visit our website to find out how you can earn a better salary.
The cost of owning a drone in South Africa
The drone industry has been gaining traction both locally and abroad over the last couple of years. With vloggers, media agencies and photographers using these nifty devices to take their passion to new heights, the public are also beginning to hop on the band waggon
Drone
3/20/2019 12:00 AMKnow the industryBridget Maoko3/20/2019 10:00 AM
drone, usage, drone licensing, laws, technology

DRONE.jpg​Read time - 02:33

The drone industry has been gaining traction both locally and abroad over the last couple of years. With vloggers, media agencies and photographers using these nifty devices to take their passion to new heights, the public are also beginning to hop on the band waggon.

But, how much does it cost to own and operate a drone in South Africa? There are a few key points to consider when discussing this:


  • Type of drone
  • Usage
  • Area
  • Licensing
  • Laws

In many instances, you can get a decent drone for a few hundred Rand, if you're a hobbyist. However, with the likes of DJI, Parrot, GoPro these can go into the thousands. It ultimately depends what you'll be using the drone for.

You can purchase drones for personal, professional and enterprise use. If you're looking for a semi-decent drone to use in your personal capacity and don't intend on making money from your images/video, you can pick up a DJI Spark for around R6 495.00 (Drone only).  The DJI Mavic range is where you start seeing value in drone photography and videography. With the recent release of the Mavic 2 Pro, the features just get better. The Mavic 2 Pro starts at around R29 500.00 for the basic drone only (no fly more pack included). Your professional and enterprise drones can go for anything between R48 000.00 and R150 000.00 each.

You are able to purchase accessories and add-ons for your DJI drones at an extra cost. They also make "fly more" kits available which include extra batteries, a case, extra propellers and other nifty items.

There are cheaper options for those just wanting to have some fun at home – national retailers like The Gadget Shop and Dion Wired, along with online stores like Takealot sell affordable alternatives. For those that want to mess around, you can fetch a drone for as little as R499.00.

Licensing

If you'd like to operate your drone commercially (make money from selling your images and video) you would need to obtain a RPL (Remote Pilot License) from an accredited school. Your RPL is comprised of a theory section and a practical.

The components covered in the theory include air law, flight planning and navigation, meteorology, human factors, principle of flight, technical aspects and other related items. Along with the theory module, students will also need to complete restricted radio license training and an English proficiency course. After your theory (which is between 5 and 7 days) you would then move on to your practical. This is done with a licensed instructor to test your practical know-how and see if you're equipped to man a drone.

Various RPL schools charge different rates for their courses but you can expect to pay anything between R20 000.00 and R50 000.00 for your license.

Legalities

The South African Civil Aviation Authority outlines the uses, dos and don'ts when it comes to RPA's (Remotely Piloted Aircrafts) in South Africa. They define RPA's as "unmanned aircrafts operated from a remote pilot station excluding toy and model aircraft". They also state "acceptable" uses of RPA's in personal and non-personal cases.

The law tries to protect both sides of the fence here – the operators and the general public. The CAA outlines that potential threats could include, but are not limited to:

  • Collision with aircraft
  • Injury to bystanders
  • Damage to property
  • Legal liabilities for breaking laws

There are a range of laws that should be adhered to when operating a drone, which you can read more about here.

Connect with us and take your Career to new heights. We are a specialist recruitment company with over 30 years of experience and can help you source top candidates in, IT, Finance, Freight and Engineering. Contact us today. 

A smarter way to banking is here
Experts say, however, that we are surprisingly not yet in the ‘digital era of banking.’
They reckon what we see today is not necessarily digital banking but simply digitized banking: ‘old financial products being adapted to the digital era and distributed via smartphones and the internet’.
banking
2/27/2019 10:00 AMKnow the industryBridget Maoko2/27/2019 10:00 AM
fintech, banking, technology, biometrics technolgy, trends in banking

shutterstock_653652982.jpgRead time - 02:39

It all started with the prolific use of smartphones, built upon by the increasing customers need for speed and convenience. It then spiralled into peer-to-peer banking and to some extent, eliminating the need for cash - epitomising a true modern way of banking. Experts say, however, that we are surprisingly not yet in the 'digital era of banking.'

They reckon what we see today is not necessarily digital banking but simply digitized banking: 'old financial products being adapted to the digital era and distributed via smartphones and the internet'. Nevertheless, the same cannot be said about the likes of Discovery Bank which describes itself as the 'world's first behavioural bank', a fully digital bank that anyone with a smartphone can join and Tyme Bank - which deems itself as SA's first digital-only bank. These digital only banks are definitely disrupting the banking industry.

Here are some trends shaping the banking industry as we know it:

Vertical cards
Bankcards were designed in landscape because of the way old machine cards work, but we don't use ATM machines anymore or at least most of us and banks realised this hence the vertical card. Take for example how you hand over your card to a cashier, tap it to make Contactless payments or dip in into a point-of-sales machines you are likely holding the card vertically, right? 

The same can be said about how we put our cards in our wallets and cell phone cardholders. Vertical cards are a growing trend among card issuers worldwide, who believe that the vertical orientation fits better with how we handle our cards these days.

You choose how you pay
Tech companies are now making it easier for their customers to make payments. Take Apple for example, they have made making a payment on Apple Pay as easy as sending a message. The same can be said about Samsung Pay, Google Pay, PayPal, Microsoft pay, WeChat pay et al.

Companies like Amazon, Uber and Starbucks are already starting to focus on prepay accounts that internalise payments by offering incentives to use their property app. So, will tech companies compete with banks in future? Probably. It's only a matter of time until they eliminate your bank altogether and give you a full-on service.

Personalisation
Imagine your bank letting you know if you are paying slightly more for utilities than your neighbour or if your rent repayments are seriously burdening you financially. Thanks to AI, this is possible. Banks will offer truer financial advice that you do not find irritating.
They will offer improved offer targeting which will lead to increased loyalty, improved profitability and increased engagement from customers. Moreover, as a customer, you will enjoy a better banking experience that saves you time and money.

Biometrics technology
Biometrics are methods of recognizing customers through their biological features like fingerprint, iris and voice recognition. It goes as far as finger vein patterns and heartbeat rate. At the moment, fingerprint is reigning supreme, followed by facial recognition - thanks to our devices.

Locally, FNB introduced an ATM that uses biometrics as a means of authentication. The TouchPoint on the ATM validates your identity by scanning your fingerprint, which is then verified with the Department of Home Affairs. Customers can also open new accounts using selfies - through biometric facial verification.

Most of us are frighten and feel like this technology is infringing on our privacy, but what's more secure between your password and finger vein pattern?  Are fraudsters likely to forge your signature or heartbeat rate?

According to research, biometric authentications are more secure than traditional methods of authentication and will gain more traction in future. 

As technological advancements continue to rise in the digital banking world, so does the need for qualified staff to manage it all. We are a specialist recruitment company with over 30 years of experience and can help you source top candidates in, IT, Finance, Freight and Engineering. Contact us today. 

The big question: are cover letters still relevant?
if a cover letter is  written, it serves as a powerful tool to help you secure the ‘job.’ It gives you a chance to sell yourself to an employer in a narrative format and explain why you are the perfect candidate
cover letter
2/20/2019 9:00 AMKnow the industryBridget Maoko2/20/2019 9:00 AM
cover letter, CV, job searching

shutterstock_326111600.jpgRead time - 01:31

The recruitment industry continues to evolve, like any other industry should. Technology is playing a big role in how things are done; new ways of doing things emerge causing old ones to be redundant, like writing a cover letter when applying for a job.

When it comes to writing a cover letter, there are two school of thoughts to it:

  1. If well written, it serves as a powerful tool to help you secure the 'job.' It gives you a chance to sell yourself to an employer in a narrative format and explain why you are the perfect candidate. In a nutshell, a strong cover letter can tip the scale in your favour when applying for a job.

2. If poorly written, a cover letter makes you come across as a weak candidate and can harm your chances of landing the job. No letter is worse than a poorly written one.

But is it still relevant?
Look at it this way: companies can now get a lot of information about you before you even set foot in the interview room. You leave digital breadcrumbs everywhere and they can use it for or against you. So with or without the cover letter, the employer will know more about you. What's important to note is that they care more about your qualifications and experience than the 300 word document accompanying your resume.

What's actually happening then?
In the digital era, your professional profile extends to your social media profiles, online portfolio et al. More and more candidates are making use of unconventional ways of standing out and unfortunately, a cover letter is not one of them. For example, some candidates would solve a problem a company is facing and approached them with a solution.

The rule of thumb is: don't always rely on your resume, the job market is competitive, and with South Africa's unemployment rate sitting on 27.1% you may want to be more creative than writing a one-page cover letter to help you stand out in the concrete jungle.

We are a recruitment company with over 30 years of experience. Contact us; we just might be able to Connect you with your next career opportunity, sans the cover letter.

The culprit in the workplace – depression!
If you feel that your work is contributing to you being depressed, try to address it with your line manager and if work isn’t the primary reason you are depressed then try to identify what else in your life could be contributing to you feeling depressed.
Depression
1/24/2019 10:00 AMTake the leadBridget Maoko1/24/2019 10:00 AM
depression, work, stress, workplace

shutterstock_536964073.jpgRead time - 02:03
According to the South African depression and anxiety group, depression is a 'whole-body' illness, involving your body, moods and thoughts. It affects the way you eat, sleep and feel about yourself. All age groups and all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups can experience depression. People living with depression are often blamed and ostracised due to the disease being poorly understood. But during the last few decades scientific research has expanded our understanding and firmly established that 'mental illnesses' like  depression are biologically brain based diseases and can be treated like any other disease.  

Intellectual functionality
Depression is a biologically brain based disease and will impair your cognitive functioning if not treated.

So are you stressed or do you have depression?
The answer lies in the severity and the duration of your symptoms. If you have been sad for over 2 weeks, you are likely depressed. Stress should last a couple of days and you should be able to bounce back. With depression however, you cannot make decisions, you struggle with problem solving, trouble sleeping, forgetfulness accompanied by feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness that last for months and sometimes years. Depressed people cannot respond to positive events in their lives. They are stuck in a loop of negativity and sometimes they feel suicide is the only way out.

Could your workplace be the reason you are depressed?
The answer is no! You cannot get depression simply from ''work.'' Unless there is something deeper going on there and work serves as a trigger. According to science: a person's life experience, genetic inheritance, age, sex, brain chemistry imbalance et al, all play a significant role in the development of depression.  

However, if you feel that your work is contributing to you being depressed, try to address it with your line manager and if work isn't the primary reason you are depressed then try to identify what else in your life could be contributing to you feeling depressed.

Assuming you are depressed

  • To your co-workers:

You will come across as someone who is indifferent, indecisive and unsure of their abilities, lacking confidence and generally lacking motivation to carry day-to-day tasks or taking longer than usual to complete simple tasks.

  • To your employer:

You may come across as a risk to the company. If you are lucky, your employer may offer support, which has yielded better results in terms of employee satisfaction and retention.

Truth is, depression, left untreated, may have a significant impact on your work performance and further contributes to presenteeism (at work but not engaged) and absenteeism. Like most health conditions, early detection and effective treatment diminishes the severity and impact of the condition. Taking time off to get medical help is crucial to the healing process.

If you are feeling stressed at work and think that a new job opportunity is what you need, we can help you with your next career move. However, if you think your depression is in its severe stages and needs professional help, please contact the South African Depression And Anxiety Group.

The Right To Disconnect
We live in a super-connected world with many employees now getting work emails sent to their smartphones. You know the drill, WhatsApp messages from work group chats and checking emails before you even step out of bed. Imagine you just got home from work, barely had time to sit down, your phone vibrates and its an email from your boss marked ‘urgent’
Disconnect
11/2/2018 2:00 PMKnow the industryBridget Maoko11/2/2018 2:00 PM
hyper-connectedness, electronic gadgets, employees, WhatsApp

whatsapp-2105015_1280.jpgRead time - 02:31 

Before we delve into the nitty-gritties of the topic: 'the right to disconnect, lets first explain where the concept stems from.
We live in a super-connected world with many employees now getting work emails sent to their smartphones. You know the drill, WhatsApp messages from work group chats and checking emails before you even step out of bed. Imagine you just got home from work, barely had time to sit down, your phone vibrates and its an email from your boss marked 'urgent' - you just got back from work!

This hyper-connectedness is causing employees to have anxiety because of the need to always respond, coupled with the expectation of receiving these messages. This then led to a culture of burned out employees with blurred lines between work-life-balance which further led to a proposed bill: 'The Right to Disconnect.'

What this 'right' means
It means we need to disconnect from our electronic gadgets and or instant messaging platforms especially if the connection is work related - after office hours. Countries like the US want to propose this bill in order to protect employees from over-engaging, unless otherwise stated in their contracts by employers that it is a prerequisite.
But is this bill realistic for a globalised workforce in a modern society? Let's delve into this.

Rest periods
As we all know employees are entitled to rest periods and bosses cannot force them to answer WhatsApp work group messages outside of their working hours. Jon Brodsky manager for finance site Finder.com thinks that restricting the hours that employers can contact their employees does not take into account global growth, remote opportunities and seamless communication between employers and employees. This then begs the question, when do employees switch off from work?

Well, it depends on your industry and type of work.
The modern workplace no longer implies your presence at the office. The modern workplace allows you to send a quick voice note or text to employees at any time of the day regardless of schedule. So should we still have bills that allow us to disconnect after work hours?

Maybe not, but it is illegal for a boss to demand around-the-clock attention from employees. Except of course if they bought you the cell phone and are paying for the data and it was stated in your contract. Then though shall not disconnect!

WhatsApp as an official tool of communication
WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger and other instant messaging platforms are now more popular than email in the workplace according to research.
We have all seen or heard of someone who got in trouble at work because of these platforms.

At FNB a good 4 employees were fired for what they communicate on WhatsApp be it 'private conversation.' I personally know a friend who ended up in HR because of what she posted on her WhatsApp 'stories'and someone who got a warning for not replying on the group chat. Companies take these platforms very serious!

In India, an IT worker got fired for leaving a WhatsApp Group chat. The manager demanded everyone use WhatsApp as an official tool of contact rather than calling and emailing. So if WhatsApp is part of your company's communication policy then you cannot make a personal decision to refrain from the platform.

However, if your company does not have a policy in place regarding communication on instant messaging platforms, then the best solution is to have honest conversations about expectations regarding this as they are not official tools of communication.

Share with us, what are your thoughts on instant messaging platforms as tools of communication in the workplace?

We are a Recruitment Company with over 3 decades of experience. Visit our website to find out how we can help you take your career to the next level.

Top technology trends for 2019
As a business, evaluating the latest technology trends will help you identify opportunities your organization can exploit to create competitive advantage. There are plenty other trends that are not on this list that you can leverage.
tech trends
10/30/2018 9:00 AMKnow the industryBridget Maoko10/30/2018 9:00 AM
Blockchain, Blockchain, AI, trends

2019 Tech - Trends.jpgRead time - 02:23

technology trend is one with substantial disruptive potential and on the verge of breaking out as an emerging state into wider impact and use. With that said, here are some technology trends we think will dominate in 2019.

Blockchain
We have all heard about blockchain and truth is, it is too complicated for lay people to understand and use right now. Blockchain is a peer-to-peer network of interconnected computers for storing data or information which can't be modified or stolen by anyone. The South African Reserve Bank, Vodacom and MTN are among companies that are testing blockchain technology in South Africa. Naomi Snyman, Blockchain Lead at Standard Bank said that if we think about how the internet started; we did not understand why we needed it or how it even works but it has completely revolutionised our lives, the same goes for Blockchain technology. Blockchain is expected to boom in 2019.

AI
Yes, AI. AI will be a trend for the next few years until it becomes mainstream. By next year, at least 40% of businesses will use it for automation. This will also cause ''autonomous things'' to proliferate. Autonomous things exist across five types: robotics, vehicles, drones, appliances and agents. All these use AI to perform tasks traditionally done by humans.

5G or fifth generation mobile
5G is finally here and is expected to bring speeds between 5Gbps to 8Gbps and up to 20Gbps– compared to 4G LTE, which has a maximum throughput of 1Gbps. According to Business Insider South Africa, these kinds of speeds are expected to dramatically change what is possible to do over a cellular connection. The first rollout of a 5G network in the US is expected to start in 2019. South Africa can expect it in 2020. 5G boasts faster data transfer speeds and lower latency than 4G, along with support for more devices and improved reliability.

Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)
The application of the Internet of Things (IoT) to the manufacturing industry is called IIoT. IIoT is considered to be one of the primary trends affecting industrial businesses today. Businesses that have embraced IIoT have seen significant improvements to safety, efficiency and profitability. This trend is expected to grow as more business adopt it.

Forbes reckon another trend is the "platform-itization" of emerging technologies, i.e blockchain as a service, VR as a service, augmented-analytics as a service, AR as a service, IOT as a service and AI as a service you get the gist.   

As a business, evaluating the latest technology trends will help you identify opportunities your organization can exploit to create competitive advantage. There are plenty other trends that are not on this list that you can leverage.

We are a Recruitment Company with over 3 decades of experience. Candidates look to us for reliable career advice and clients partner with us to connect them with exceptional candidates. Visit our website to learn more about us.

Is an MBA worth it?
An MBA is considered the world’s most important business management qualification. But is this prestigious degree still worthy of pursuing? Well, it depends what you want to use it for. Not all MBA degrees are created equal and an MBA like most post graduate degrees will always add value to your career.
Is an MBA worth it?
10/5/2018 6:00 AMTake the leadBridget Maoko10/4/2018 2:00 PM
MBA, heightened career,  salary increase, professionals, business

shutterstock_787671874.jpgRead time - 01:28

Short for Master of Business Administration, the MBA is considered the world's most important business management qualification. But is this prestigious degree still worthy of pursuing? Well, it depends what you want to use it for.

Traditionally when you hear of MBA you instantly think that your career will be heightened and your salary will increase, that's true. Studies show that the average annual pre-MBA salary is R297 731 and will jump to R393 783 once one gets the degree. The current annual average salary starts from R560 285.



You will probably be paid more if you go to a business schools that employers prefer.Best Business School.jpg

 

 










Heightened career and salary increase are not always a given. An MBA is now common. The prestige and exclusivity it had has diminished and the value of pursuing it has come under scrutiny given the substantial investment of time and money one has to incur in order to get the degree. Pursuing an MBA will set you back by at least R200 000.

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Top that with the fact that it is no longer a differentiator for professionals who are looking to make themselves more desirable to employers and the fact that the qualification is no longer as sought-after as it was in its heydays, an MBA may not be worth pursuing, after all it can only secure the interview and not the job itself.

But if you plan to work in a business-related field in management, or as a company founder then it may be worth pursuing. For those working in other industries, unless you are in management or leadership roles, it may not be as useful as you think.

If you are thinking of applying your chances of acceptance are as follows:

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Not all MBA degrees are created equal and an MBA like most post graduate degrees will always add value to your career, so it is all up to you and what you will make out of it that will determine its worth. We are a Specialist Recruitment Company with over 30 years of experience. Visit our website to learn how we can take your career to the next level, with or without an MBA. 

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